The Cone 2 (Kaylee’s Kryptonite)

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Kaylee had been the one with the power. Toys, balls, treats, anything she wanted she simply took. That was until the day Zoey had to wear the cone, otherwise known as an Elizabethan collar. You see, we have two puppies. Kaylee is 11 months old, and Zoey is 6 months old.

Whereas Kaylee tends to be a bit fearful, Zoey is fearless. You may have read my earlier blog about Kaylee’s experience with the cone. Now it was Zoey’s turn, and she wore the cone like it was a special honor. She quickly discovered that it gave her power over her big sister. Since Kaylee was afraid of the cone, now Zoey started taking away the toys, balls, and anything else she wanted. She’d march right up to Kaylee and nudge her with the cone and take what she wanted.

I also had to reinforce our free-standing dog gate, since Zoey discovered that she could use the cone as a battering ram to move it out of the way! When it snowed, Zoey had a blast using the cone as a snow plow to gather, then eat snow. All in all, wearing that cone has been a fun adventure for her.

This gave me a different perspective on cones and limitations. Are they limitations or opportunities for new adventures? As G.K. Chesterton said, “An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered.” What inconveniences have you turned into adventures lately?

By the way, Zoey is done wearing the cone, and the power is now more balanced between our two puppies. The adventures continue!

Turn your inconveniences into adventures.

“Consider it pure joy, my brothers, whenever you face trials of many kinds” James 1:2

The Cone

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We’re not talking ice cream here. That would be better, especially in these 80-90 degree days of summer here in Oxford, Pennsylvania. No, we are talking about the other cone. The dreaded “Elizabethan collar” type of cone that dogs must wear after having surgery.

Yes, it was time, and we got our sweet little puppy, Kaylee, spayed. When we got her home, we put the cone on to keep her from licking or biting her incision. Much to our surprise, she would not move at all. We’ve had dogs before, and it always took them a little while to get used to walking around wearing the cone. They’d bump into the wall a few times but would pretty quickly figure out how to maneuver. Not our Kaylee. She simply sat and stayed. We tried all sorts of suggestions to get her used to it, to no avail.

Our puppy, Kaylee, before surgery.

Sometimes I think God puts a cone on us at times. He wants to protect us, heal us, and help us grow, but we are inclined to interfere with that process. At least I am. Do you ever feel that way? For example, there was a long season in which I wanted to move out of working in the intensive care unit. I was tired of it all – the challenges, the ethical dilemmas, the stress, everything. I prayed; I begged; I applied for other jobs. God said stay. I felt like Kaylee with her cone. Looking back now, I see that it was for my own good. I am actually thankful and glad. In case you’re curious, I still work in the intensive care unit. The challenges there haven’t really changed, but God continues changing me through those challenges.

After a few days of having to take Kaylee’s cone off to walk her and get her to go to the bathroom, our son, Dan, found a different type of cone that she actually became more accustomed to. She even sits and stays still for me to place it. Her incision is healing and we now have only 2-4 more days before we can leave it off. One of the first things I plan to do when she’s free is take her to the park then stop for an ice cream cone (for me) on the way back.

“No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.” Hebrews 12:11

God can change you through your challenges.